The Formula One Commission has backed proposals by the sport’s engine makers to delay the introduction of a new power plant by one year – a move which will also see teams adopt the V6 turbo rather than the four-cylinder concept.

Under the original plans, Formula One was set to move away from the current 2.4-litre V8 regulations to that of a 1.6-litre V4 turbo. However this was met with opposition from Ferrari, with the Prancing Horse arguing that the switch would not be of any relevance to its road car division.

The Italian manufacturer’s concerns were also joined by those of Mercedes and Cosworth, with the latter calling for clarity to be reached.

Subsequently this led to behind-the-scenes discussions, prior to the Commission’s meeting in Heathrow on Wednesday, with the manufacturers and the teams asking the powers-that-be to adopt a six-cylinder engine and for the rule changes to be put back from 2013 to the year after.

As a result of this decision it is widely expected that these new proposals will be ratified by the World Motor Sport Council next week, as they will still allow the sport to fit in with the governing body’s environmental tendencies by continuing to use the extensive hybrid energy recovery systems first proposed.

Although this alteration could not have come without the support of Renault, it remains unclear if the French Manufacturer will remain in Formula One – with it having already poured a great deal of resources into the V4 concept and its board thought to have only supported its stay in F1 based on these future regulations.

It is also unclear where the ruling will leave Craig Pollock’s PURE initiative, which had looked set to enter the sport as another engine manufacturer and had also been far advanced in its interpretation of the four-cylinder design.

Overall the decision to delay these new regulations may well suit the majority of players currently involved in the sport, but, The Formula One Commission has backed proposals by sport’s engine makers to delay the introduction of a new power plant by one year, in a move which will also see teams adopt a V6 turbo rather than the four-cylinder concept.

Under the original plans, Formula One was set to move away from the current 2.4-litre V8 regulations to that of a 1.6-litre V4 turbo, however this was met with opposition from Ferrari which believed the switch would not be of any relevance to its road car division.

The Italian manufacturer’s concerns were also joined by those of Mercedes and Cosworth, with the latter calling for clarity to be reached.

Subsequently this led to behind-the-scenes discussions, prior to the Commission’s meeting in Heathrow on Wednesday, with the manufacturers and the teams asking the powers-that-be to adopt a six-cylinder engine and for the rule changes to be put back from 2013 to the year after.

As a result of this decision it is widely expected that these new proposals will be ratified by the World Motor Sport Council next week, as they will still allow the sport to fit in with the governing body’s environmental tendencies by continuing to use the extensive hybrid energy recovery systems first proposed.

Although this alteration could not have come without the support of Renault, it remains unclear if the French Manufacturer will remain in Formula One – with it having already poured a great deal of resources into the V4 concept and its board thought to have only supported its stay in F1 based on these future regulations.

It is also unclear where the ruling will leave Craig Pollock’s PURE initiative, which had looked set to enter the sport as another engine manufacturer and had also been far advanced in its interpretation of the four-cylinder design.

Overall the decision to delay these new regulations may well suit the majority of players currently involved in the sport, but it will do little to entice new manufacturers or heighten its green credentials in the meantime.

Whilst the V8s will now endure until 2014, the work of the likes of Audi and Peugeot in Sportscar racing will continue to dwarf any road relevant technology derived in Formula One and therefore limit its capacity to reach out to the common motorist.

Today’s decision also places more questions on the leadership of Jean Todt, who has now backed down on the very set of regulations which he had championed for so long.

Then again, the Frenchman’s openness to compromise with engine makers may well be viewed positively, as it has hopefully ended any untoward tension which may have arisen.

Even though it will now take longer than anticipated, Formula One is set to move into an exciting unknown with new power plants and new innovation at the forefront of automobile technology.

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